Center for Policing

Promises and Perils of Law Enforcement Technology

Promises and Perils of
Law Enforcement
Information Technology

Rosalyn Bocker Parks

Rosalyn Bocker Parks
Research Project Manager for the Center on Policing
Department
Email
rosalyn.bocker@cop.rutgers.edu

Rosalyn Bocker Parks, Ph.D., serves as the Research Project Manager for the Center on Policing. She worked as a graduate assistant on Police Institute projects starting in 2009 and became full-time staff in 2016. Her recent projects include data analysis for a local police department and work for the Independent Monitor of the Newark Department of Public Safety’s Police Division team. She also provides analysis, research support, and project management and development for Police Institute programs. Dr. Bocker Parks graduated summa cum laude from the College of New Jersey in 2009 and earned her doctorate from Rutgers University in 2015. Her dissertation research focused on identifying spatiotemporal hotspots of bar disorder in Newark, NJ, for which she received a Rutgers University Dissertation Fellowship Award.

Thomas J O'Reilly

Thomas J O'Reilly
Executive Policy Advisor of the Center on Policing
Department
Email
thomas.oreilly@cop.rutgers.edu

Thomas O’Reilly is the Executive Policy Advisor of the Center on Policing. He serves as an expert on best practices in sharing intelligence and creating collaborative environments across all levels of government.  His leadership in solving community issues and building mutually trusting relationships between police agencies and communities currently serves as a model for our country.

From 2006 to 2012 O’Reilly served at the U S Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Justice Management Division directing both NSI and NIEM outreach. He was appointed by the US Attorney General as the Director of the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Report (NSI) Initiative Program Management Office (PMO) in February, 2010.  He lead a team of representatives from the Department of Justice, the Office of the Directorate of National Intelligence (ODNI), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and State, Local, and Tribal agencies in the implementation of SAR to all fusion centers nationwide, state and local law enforcement and the major law enforcement components of the federal government. To date this program has generated over 20,000 suspicious activity reports which resulted in 900 investigations.

At the same time, O’Reilly served as the U.S. Department of Justice’s Senior Policy Advisor for the Office of the Chief Information Officer and Bureau of Justice Assistance.  In this role, O’Reilly supports the commitment of the DOJ and DHS to dramatically expand the country’s network of state and local Fusion Centers and implement the National Information Exchange Model (NIEM).  O’Reilly was also a member of the Fusion Center PMO Advisory Board, which develops policies and implements the goals of the National Strategy for Information Sharing for 72 Fusion Centers and served as the co-chair of the Joint Training and Technical Assistance Program which has supported the network of fusion centers with assistance from privacy to technology.

Prior to his positions in the federal government, Mr. O’Reilly was Administrator of the New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety, the organization responsible for oversight of the state police, homeland security, emergency management, fusion center operations, criminal justice system coordination, criminal and civil legal services, and juvenile justice. Mr. O’Reilly also served as the assistant director of the New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice as well as Chief of Police Programs for the State Law Enforcement Planning Agency, and was the planning officer for the Trenton, NJ, Police Division.

O’Reilly earned a B.S. degree in Criminal Justice with a concentration on Police Management from Northeastern University in 1972 and a M.A. in Administration from Rider University in 1977.  He also became a Certified Public Manager from Rutgers University in 1984.  O’Reilly received the U.S. Department of Justice Assistant Attorney General Award for Achievement and Leadership for the NSI in 2011 and is a two-time recipient of the Federal 100 Award for his efforts in expanding the adoption and use of the National Information Exchange Model (NIEM) and the NSI. He received the Marvin Award from the National Attorney General’s Association, The National Criminal Justice Association recognized O’Reilly’s lifetime service by honoring him with the National Lifetime Achievement Award and the Secretary of Homeland Security recognized him in 2012 for his lifetime contributions to public safety.

Previously, Mr. O’Reilly was elected President of the National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA) and Vice Chairman of DOJ’s Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative Advisory Committee, and served as a member of the National Crime Information Center Advisory Committee of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Criminal Justice Information Services Advisory Policy Board. He currently serves on the IACP Research Advisory Committee and the Global Intelligence Working Group.

Linda Tartaglia

Linda Tartaglia
Director of the Center on Policing
Department
Email
linda.tartaglia@cop.rutgers.edu

Linda Tartaglia serves as the Director of the Center on Policing. She has extensive experience in the development, implementation, review and analysis of law enforcement and criminal justice policies and practices on the federal, state and local level. She currently serves as the Director of the Center on Policing where she oversees the day-to-day operations of the Institute in fulfilling the mission of integrating research and police operations, problem solving and community policing.

Formerly, as the Community Justice Coordinator for the New Jersey Attorney General, Ms. Tartaglia was responsible for building trust and confidence between law enforcement and the community by coordinating the state’s violent crime and urban initiatives, and working to integrate the efforts of police, prosecutors, and the community. These programs were a collaborative problem-solving process for addressing violent crime and its community-wide effects in New Jersey’s cities.

As a senior policy analyst for the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Policy Development, Ms. Tartaglia was instrumental in the design and development of the federal Weed and Seed Initiative, an early attempt to build closer ties between law enforcement and the community.

Ms. Tartaglia started her law enforcement career as a state investigator for the NJ Division of Criminal Justice, Program Integrity Section where she investigated fraud, waste and abuse.  In 2007, she was appointed a Special Investigator to the NJ State Commission of Investigations, coordinating their Organized Crime and Racketeering Projects. In both of these capacities she conducted complex and confidential investigations, which required managing the flow of information and intelligence, gathering evidence and conducting interviews, as well as identifying internal control deficiencies. These investigations were followed by a report with legislative and policy recommendations and public hearings.

She was appointed Assistant Director of the Narcotics Task Force where she managed the State’s drug and alcohol program on behalf of the NJ Governor and the Attorney General, and she served as the spokesperson for the Governor’s Cabinet-Level Working Group on Substance Abuse.